Sunday March 16th 2008

Hold On
Hold on to what is good,
Even if it’s a handful of earth.
Hold on to what you believe,
Even if it’s a tree that stands by itself.
Hold on to what you must do,
Even if it’s a long way from here.
Hold on to your life,
Even if it’s easier to let go.
Hold on to my hand,
Even if someday
I’ll be gone away from you.

~ A Pueblo Indian Prayer

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Get it done today, Tomorrow ain’t promised.


Thought for Today
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
“Live neither in the past nor in the future,
but let each day’s work absorb your entire energies,
and satisfy your widest ambition.”

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Sir William Osler


Jimmy was a couple years older than I was. We attended the same high school though I knew little about him. Not long after he graduated, he came to work in the family business. Only able to work summer months because of school I was not aware. When I found out, I was a little surprised, although I did not really know Jimmy; I just did not picture him as a construction laborer. In high school, he was a basketball star and I always thought of him as prim and proper. Even digging ditches, I do not recall ever seeing a hair on his head out of place.

After working with Jimmy for a week or so, I noticed that he did not have much “get up and go” about him. He seemed to have a pace and no matter what, he worked that pace. I found this odd because my dad was all about “get up and go”. He made sure that was a part of our upbringing. “Get it done today” he used to say, “Tomorrow ain’t promised.” And of course I couldn’t resist and would say something smart like, “Well if tomorrow ain’t coming then it don’t matter any how.”

I questioned dad about why he had hired Jimmy and he replied, “Well son, Jimmy ain’t got much git up and go, this is true. But what the boy doesn’t have in ambition he makes up for in loyalty.” “He works hard and is dedicated as long as he knows what is expected of him.” “Jimmy is the type of fellow that you could give a hammer and a chisel and instruct him to make pebbles out of a bolder. He will stay there until the job is complete, and then wait, for further instructions”.

Jimmy continued to work for the family until the business sold years later. Never missing a day, he tended his responsibilities, worked his pace, and never complained. I would imagine that wherever Jimmy is today he still has that hammer and chisel.